Tag Archives: installation artist

Meet The Artist in Residence: Kathryn Beavers

Kathryn Beavers artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of December 2019, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Kathryn some questions about her work and studio practice:

Kathryn Beavers, December 2019 artist in residence

Kathryn Beavers, December 2019 artist in residence

Q: To start off, please tell us about your background.
I am originally from Bucks County, PA and now reside in Philadelphia, PA. I attended the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) in Baltimore, MD and received my BFA in Painting this past summer. This year I did my first residency at The Vermont Studio Center which opened my eyes to the possibilities of residency programs. I always knew I wanted to be a painter and muralist in the art world.

Q: How would you describe your work?
I would describe my work as all encompassing installation that borderlines on being site specific. Landscape and body converge as they were the first forms of art that I was formally trained in. These collisions of spaces focus on line as the main thread of piecing together a full mural and installation. I world-build but it is all of our world and the creatures that inhabit our Earth as well as minds creating a sense oneness with alien.

Kathryn Beavers, marker and pen drawing on tracing paper, June 2019

Kathryn Beavers, marker and pen drawing on tracing paper, June 2019

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
Layering and more layering. I edit by adding. I relate it to propagation in the natural world. Something I realized early on when making art is that I need to be active. I move around a lot and need to be able to see the physicality of the mark. My mind is typically in a state of undulation of feelings real and unreal so I go back and forth between natural non-archival materials as well as paint as the basis for all of the moving parts.

Kathryn Beavers in her studio at Main Street Arts

Kathryn Beavers in her studio at Main Street Arts

Q: What are your goals for this residency? Tell us about your current projects.
For this residency I really want to focus on small works. I am constantly in flux between grand scale and micro objects, and size is something I can not stay consistent with. I would also like to explore and push my ideas and concepts to a more specific realm. I often have too many ideas floating around in my head so trying to narrow down what exactly I want to say has been the goal.

Kathryn Beavers, Irritation, acrylic, matt medium, watercolor, marker on paper

Kathryn Beavers, Irritation, acrylic, matte medium, watercolor, marker on paper

Q: Do you collect anything?
I probably collect too many things. I am not a hoarder, but rocks and “free souvenirs” as Quentin Moseley would say. I have bags of dried flowers, some dried gourds, a lot of dead things. And then there are baskets, containers, bags, and vessels. I have a bag filled with bags, sometimes I take them out and stuff them for reference. I like looking at different types of sacks and pots and even cages.

Kathryn Beavers, Sunny Side Up, acrylic, sand, gloss medium, marker on stretched fabric, 39 x 41in.

Kathryn Beavers, Sunny Side Up, acrylic, sand, gloss medium, marker on stretched fabric, 39 x 41in.

Q: What advice would you give to other artists?
My advice to others artists is very simple: I think you never know until you try. I would say go at it with gusto. There’s a difference between overworking a piece and pushing it to 105%. Never leave something where you are wondering if you should still make a move or not. I say go for it.

Q: Who inspires you and why?
Terry Winters, I can’t help but always go back to his Tessellation Figures and his notebooks. Elizabeth Murray, Katharina Grosse, Barbara Takenega, Georgia O’Keefe, Rina Banerjee… There are too many women for me to count and name. I absolutely adore taking in hybrid paintings. I love Op Art, Installation Art, and performance work that takes in consideration of the time and place in which it is occurring. There are so many musicians and different art forms that influence me, especially glass-blowing as a medium.

Undulating Systems, Temporary Site-specific studio Installation/Mural, acrylic, polyfil, canvas, cut paper, organic materials, fake plants, (MICA) Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, MD, 2017

Kathryn Beavers, Undulating Systems, Temporary Site-specific studio Installation/Mural, acrylic, polyfil, canvas, cut paper, organic materials, fake plants, (MICA) Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, MD, 2017

Q: What was your experience like in art school?
MICA was an incredible experience. Incredibly difficult and incredibly transformative. The pressure was definitely felt every year. I didn’t know I could be pushed as far as I went honestly. There were visiting artists and lectures constantly, if you wanted to jump in it was very accessible. There were so many incredible female artists/professors I met during my time there that made me believe it was possible to hold a space in the art world : Carolyn Case, Lauren Adams, Katherine Mann, and Alex Ebstein just to name a few.

Q: What’s next for you?
After this residency I am going to go back to Philadelphia to work and continue making art whenever I can. In May I plan on doing another residency in Minnesota at the New York Mills Retreat.

Q: Where else can we find you?
www.kathrynbeavers.com
behance: behance.net/KathrynBeavers
Instagram: instagram.com/kathryn_beavers_
Facebook: facebook.com/kathryn.beavers.54
Pinterest: pinterest.com/kathryn_beavers_/

Meet the Artist in Residence: Vickie Pierre

Vickie Pierre artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of November 2019, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Vickie some questions about her work and studio practice:

Artist Vickie Pierre

Artist Vickie Pierre

Q: To start off, please tell us about your background.
I’m originally from Brooklyn, New York and graduated from the School of Visual Arts 1997.  I’ve been living and working in Miami, Florida for the last 20+ years.  Prior to my full time studio practice, I spent years working as a fine art preparator in New York and then a Museum Registrar for local institutions in Miami.  I now work occasionally as a Registrar Consultant for local collectors and museums.

I Can't Say No to You (Good Enough) 2014 Mixed medial installation

“I Can’t Say No to You (Good Enough)” by Vickie Pierre, 2014. Mixed media installation.

Q: How would you describe your work?
My practice includes painting, collage and installations. I explore my Haitian American identity, with references to design and the decorative arts and the natural world. I also consider the connections between my Caribbean heritage and global cultural mythologies and their relationship to contemporary cultural politics.

Elemental Mistresses (The Power of 3) 2016

“Elemental Mistresses (The Power of 3)”, by Vickie Pierre, 2016

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
My paintings and collages usually begin with background color buildup followed by basic forms applied with rubber stamps or brushes. Sometimes I’ll draw on the surface to mark out possible shapes and collage placement. The assemblages and installations are trickier. I’ll visualize these projects for a longer period of time, even before I sketch it out. Once I’ve completed it in my mind, I’ll put it to paper and then the best part, I make it!

That's How Important She Was (Poupees in the Bush series) 2019, Acrylic and decorative paper collage.

“That’s How Important She Was (Poupees in the Bush series)” by Vickie Pierre, 2019. Acrylic and decorative paper collage.

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
I have many favorite artists (old and new) so it’s difficult to choose… I love the Surrealists and Matisse. Barbara Chase Riboud, Miriam Shapiro, Faith Ringold and the Saar Family women. There’s also Willie Cole, Jim Hodges, Lari Pitman. And of course back to women! All of the incredible women artists who have inspired me for decades: Petah Coyne, Annette Messager, Chakaia Booker, Sue Williams and on and on!

Queen on the Pyre (Poupees in the Bush series) 2018, Acrylic and decorative paper collage.

“Queen on the Pyre (Poupees in the Bush series)” by Vickie Pierre, 2018. Acrylic and decorative paper collage.

Q: Where are your favorite places to see artwork? 
One of my favorite places to see artwork is at the Geffen Contemporary at MOCA (previously the Temporary Contemporary). I lived in Los Angeles in the early 90s just before enrolling at SVA and spent many hours visiting with the art there.

She Wolf (Poupees in the Bush series) 2018. Acrylic and decorative paper collage.

“She Wolf (Poupees in the Bush series)” by Vickie Pierre, 2018. Acrylic and decorative paper collage.

Q: What advice would you give to other artists? 
My advice for others artists would be to determine from the onset if being a working artist is what you ultimately want. Perseverance is so important to sustaining your practice, even when it seems as if nothing is happening. My instructors at SVA used to say, ” work comes from work” and “paint your truth” so I try to practice everyday even when I’m not in my studio. I always have a pad and pen with me to jot down ideas or draw a vision that may come to me.

Totem For My Sisters (We Are Illuminous!) 2019. Mixed media installation.

“Totem For My Sisters (We Are Illuminous!)” by Vickie Pierre, 2019. Mixed media installation.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
My goal for this residency is to continue working on the current themes in my work but also include elements of inspiration from living and working in Clifton Springs. I plan on using this opportunity to work on several projects including larger collage artworks.

Q: What’s next for you?
I have a solo exhibition coming up in the next year, so I plan on continuing to work and prepare for this career milestone.

Q: Where else can we find you?
My work can be see on my website: www.vickiepierre.com and on Instagram: @vpvpierre

Meet the Artist in Residence: Jeff Schofield

Jeff Scholfield artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of November 2019, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Jeff some questions about his work and studio practice:

Jeff Schofield

Jeff Schofield

Q: To start off, please tell us about your background.
I grew up as an American expatriate in Europe, where I lived with my family for decades. I studied architecture at Columbia University and pursued a career in New York, Paris and Dubai designing sustainable buildings and urban masterplans. Along the way I began making art, also expressing sustainable themes, which gradually developed into a full-time occupation. For the past ten years I’ve devoted myself to artistic pursuits, which includes curatorial work in galleries and art fairs. I studied sculpture at Cranbrook Academy of Art in Detroit, Michigan, where I am currently based as an emerging artist.

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“Beach Litter” by Jeff Scholfield. Plastic and metal litter in recycled glass jars filled with lake water

Q: How would you describe your work?
I am an installation artist working with sustainable themes. I upcycle found objects, such as beach litter, salvaged wood, newspapers, car parts and everyday detritus, into irreverent art installations. My material choices involve discarded items with their own life cycles, containing stories of human use, interaction and ultimately disposal. I experiment with this detritus through processes of collecting and cataloging to create large scale artworks examining critical narratives that question the sustainability of post-industrial society.

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“Michigan Forest Fire” by Jeff Schofield. Burnt tree trunks hung on metal chains.

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I use two complimentary approaches to investigate the landscape as a source of artistic expression. One, I explore outdoors to document specific sites of human trespassing in nature, which I try to interpret through in-situ installations. Two, I install artworks indoors using discarded materials found in the field. I conceive this artwork in the open air, through walks, hikes and forms of wandering, as methods for collecting and documenting the land. Landscape interventions are expressed through photography to highlight aspects of human agency, and through collection to understand natural sites as retainers of those agencies. I explore notions of “making do,” material life cycles, overproduction and accumulation.

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“Picnic at the Beach” by Jeff Schofield. Recycled plastic picnic ware and life vests hung on ropes and buoys.

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio?
I use the camera a lot while developing a large-scale art installation, especially regarding an outdoor piece. There are two main reasons for employing this technique. One, the siting and lighting are crucial for the public to view a piece properly, and photos provide me insight on how to do this comprehensively right from the start of a project. Second, many of my outdoor pieces are intended to decay over time, and photos allow me to record this process visually, so viewers can see the progression and understand the underlying concept as a narrative.

"Beach Toys" by Jeff Schofield. Recycled plastic beach toys hung on ropes and buoys.

“Beach Toys” by Jeff Schofield. Recycled plastic beach toys hung on ropes and buoys.

Q: Do you collect anything?
Collection is a cornerstone of my art practice. I accumulate many things found in nature, in the city, in my kitchen, among my friends, almost anywhere. Found objects constitute my art palette, including plastic, metal, glass, ropes, newspapers, salvaged wood, burnt wood, beach litter, forest litter, sidewalk litter, old toys, broken toys, broken tools, rusty tools, rusty nails, hair, hats, shoes, belts, wheels, tires, car parts, almost anything non-perishable. Storage is a big part of my art practice, and I manage this constraint as well as I can.

"Subject to Flooding" by Jeff Schofield. Sapling tree trunks on forest floor

“Subject to Flooding” by Jeff Schofield. Sapling tree trunks on forest floor

Q: Who is your favorite artist and why?
My ultimate reference is Marcel Duchamp, who pioneered “ready-made” artwork a century ago. My upcycling artworks derive from this, though they are many generations removed. Contemporary artists I look at include Andy Goldsworthy, Lauren Bon, Mona Hatoum, Mary Mattingly and many others too numerous to mention.

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“Ford Escort” by Jeff Schofield. Car body parts hung on ropes and pulleys

Q: Who inspires you and why?
Hemingway, whose deceptively simple writing style expresses vivid emotions.

Philip Glass, whose whimsical compositions exude deeply emotional sounds.

Greta Thunberg, whose simple message on climate change is universally powerful.

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Trash to Treasure Series: “Banner of Trash” by Jeff Schofield. Found objects bound with twine

What was your experience like at art school?
Cranbrook’s multi-disciplinary pedagogy provided me a chance to delve into the complex inter-related realms of art and design. Most striking was the sheer diversity of the student body; everyone was unique in character and talent. I learned how to search for artistic freedom, and this creative journey will continue for a lifetime. Preparing a master’s thesis forced me to build bridges between visual thinking and conceptual writing. I adopted collaboration with fellow students as a working method to develop sustainable ideas more broadly. Sharing these events with others, including the successes and failures, helped me build a permanent network of professional colleagues.

"Outside Ourselves" by Jeff Schofield. Storm-damaged pear tree branches.

“Outside Ourselves” by Jeff Schofield. Storm-damaged pear tree branches.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I aim to continue building the body of work I am currently developing with plastic and metal found objects. I will work with discarded materials that can be found in Ontario County public parklands in order to explore human transgressions of natural sites. I will make day trips to local parks, trails, lakes and rivers to collect thrown-away plastic, metal, glass and other inorganic waste. The landscape offers unexpected sources of inspiration and materials, in this case discarded junk. Using everyday items such as string, wire, paper, scrap fabric, etc, I will transform ordinary items into extraordinary artwork. My purpose is to interrogate received notions of recycling and repair. I aim to explore wacky and nonfunctional art forms by converting trash into treasure.

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Trash to Treasure Series: “Pillow of Trash”. Found objects bound with twine

q: What’s next for you?
As an ongoing program, I plan to visit other natural sites around the country and examine discarded refuse as materials to create art expressing sustainability issues specific to each locality. I am scheduled for an Artist-in-Residence program at PlySpace in Muncie, Indiana, in the spring of 2020. Just before then I will have a solo exhibition at Hatch Art Gallery in Detroit, Michigan. I will also participate in a group exhibition at the Sculpture Center in Cleveland, Ohio, in the summer of 2020.

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Q: Where else can we find you?
My website is www.JeffSchofield.net
My Facebook art page is Jeff Scofield Art

 

Meet the Artist in Residence: Gregory Dirr

Gregory Dirr, artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of September 2019, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Gregory some questions about his work and studio practice:

Gregory Dirr and his works at Bailey Contemporary, July 2019

Q: To start off, please you tell us about your background.

I’m from Miami but I live and work in Boca Raton, I work as a full-time visual artist. I’ve been making art for as long as I can remember; from a very young age it was something I was known for by my peers and even my family. I created more serious bodies of work during high school and applied to Ringling College in Sarasota where I received my BFA in 2008. After college, I started an artist collective – Thought Coalition – to help not only myself, but my friends and other emerging artists build relationships with businesses and art gallery owners.

Because of Thought Coalition I was able to accrue a lot of experience in curating and event organizing. I work as art director for Healing Blends Global, art director at Sickle Cell Natural Wellness Group, I am co-curator of Shangri-La Collective, and I have spearheaded some projects with local businesses all while pursuing my own studio stuff.

Q: How would you describe your work? 

Primarily, I’m a painter. I do, however, work in printmaking, sculpture, installation, collage, video, and music but I always circle back to painting. I’ve always been interested in various ways of creating and my own career has led me to dip into a plethora of art forms.

My subject matter is all a study for a book I’ve been writing for several years. I create landscapes, observational pieces, realism, or dreamy imagery as a response to my surroundings. These responses are sort of existential, which is touching into what my book is about, even if the references for the book are a bit obscure.

Flora

Flora, 2018, Gouache on raw canvas

I also love children’s folklore and literature. A few of my successful pieces are inspired by children’s stories that have a fantastical world like James and the Giant Peach, Grimm’s Tales, Oz series, The Phantom Tollbooth, and Alice in Wonderland.

GregoryDirr_James And The Giant Peach

James and The Giant Peach, 2017, Acrylic, gouache, ink on canvas

Q: What was your experience like at art school?

During college, I was constantly surrounded by other visual artists. At school I would get a glimpse of other artists’ work and their studio processes. We had to write papers about them and critique their work which turned out to be valuable and introspective to my own work. That analytical way of thinking allowed me to apply it to my own work and become less biased of the art I create.

immured

Immured, 2008, Acrylic, toothpaste, collage, medical tape, iridescent ink

Q: Where are your favorite places to see artwork?

My favorite places to see art are in an artist’s studio or home, where they work. I feel like I’m getting an unedited version of what their process looks like. I enjoy looking at the duality of how something can look so orchestrated when it’s in a gallery, a book, or online versus how human it looks in person.

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio?

What’s most valuable to my process is actually a sketchbook or journal, something to write down or draw thoughts. To me it’s more than doodling or sketching – I write ideas or even potential color palette combinations. Sometimes I even just write a single word, sometimes I write lyrics. I think the thought process behind an idea is more valuable than the actual painting of the artwork itself. I can be working on a very successful idea, but if I’m not elaborating on it aesthetically or conceptually, it will never grow. This is where a sketchbook comes into play.

Q: What are your goals for this residency? 

I want to mix my observational stuff with my landscapes with my fantastical illustrations with my graphic work and find a middle ground between them. I’m also going to use this opportunity to paint bigger than what I’m usually working because my current working space is at home. That all being said, I’d love to use this opportunity to be influenced by the surrounding imagery of Clifton Springs. I’ve never been to upstate New York so I’m excited to explore the area – especially the nature.

Currently, I’m working with Nordstrom on a project, I’m also working on a regional grant proposal. I always have something in the works be it public art, upcoming shows, commissions, directing art – you name it. This month at Main Street Arts is going to give a reprise from most of those things.

Q: Where else can we find you?

My website — GregoryDirr.com has some bodies of work gathered in an organized type of way.

Instagram — @gregorydirr it where I post only art, usually current stuff or things I’m just interested in showing off. :)

My blog — gregorydirr.wordpress.com where the art is all over the place!

And my Facebook business page — @Gregory Dirr and it lists all my upcoming and and recent works. :)

 

Meet the Artist in Residence: Siena Hancock

Siena Hancock, artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of December 2018, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Siena some questions about her work and studio practice:

Artist working during residency in Iceland

Artist working during residency in Iceland

Q: Tell us about your background.
I am from Massachusetts, currently I live in Malden which is where I was born but moved around a lot as a child so it is hard to say what my exact origins are. As a kid I was always artistic but didn’t realize what I wanted to do with that until I went to art school and discovered sculpture. I went to school in Boston at Massachusetts College of Art and Design, where I majored in glass. Since graduating in 2016, I have spent a great deal of time traveling. I backpacked through Europe one summer and this past spring I spent three months at a residency in Iceland. When I’m not traveling, I work for a fabrication studio in Boston that specializes in creating glass sculpture for a variety of clients: fine-artists, architectural projects, and public monuments.

venus

Venus of Raudsokkreyfingin, papier-mâché, 6′x6.5′x4.5′, 2018

Q: How would you describe your work?
My work is an interdisciplinary, socially-engaged practice which strives to be a conversation between people, place, and media. It is based in process, the process of craft and research, and by marrying these ideas I create sculpture and installation that seeks to educate viewers and illuminate the state of our world and women’s place within it.

Q: What is your process for making a work of art?
I tend to start with research for my larger projects, using texts and online resources to inform my work. From there I will start to develop a visual map of how to present my findings in artistic form. I work in a large variety of materials, usually they are connected to craft traditions, but I have been starting to experiment more with found objects and new media.

Nibble

NibbleBreast, white chocolate & artist’s body, 14″x12″x6″, 2015

Q: Who are your favorite artists?
I have a very long list of artistic influences including: Lynda Benglis, Eva Hesse, Faith Wilding, Louise Bourgeois, Cindy Sherman, Victoria Sin, Doreen Garner, Sarah Lucas, Carolee Schneemann, Annie Sprinkle, and Yayoi Kusama. All of them are amazing women artists that have done so much to push the boundaries of art.

Q: Where is your favorite place to view art?
MassMOCA in North Adams, MA is one of my all time favorite places to view art. The museum is made up of several industrial size buildings and this allows artists to create large-scale installations. I go to see most of the shows and they always make a huge impact, partially due to the space.

dmc

DMC, blown glass, clay/cement, LED, sand, cast glass, mirror, mylar, plaster, installation space: 12′x15′, 2016

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I am working on several projects that all fall under the umbrella of research I have been conducting using feminist sci-fi texts which depict utopias. I am investigating what is a feminist utopia and how one can be formed, more specifically I am interested in learning what other women think this could mean and creating an audio record of their thoughts. This is an ongoing project I began in Iceland. In addition to this, I am creating sci-fi feminist action figures. I’ll also be doing some ceramic work with molds and experimenting with site-specific installation using found objects.

thefall_detail

Detail from recent installation: The Fall (from Vogue), magazine, mirror, mylar, mirrored blown-glass, and mono-filament, 2018

Q: What’s next?
It’s hard to say…I am interested in applying for MFA programs in a year or so. I’m working with a friend in Boston on curating some all-female shows in the area and hope to do more residencies. I may end up going to Italy in the spring for work.

Q: Where can we find you?
My website is sienajhancock.com.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Kelly Clare

Kelly Clare, artist in residence at Main Street Arts, during the months of January and February 2018, is working in one of our two studio spaces on our second floor. We asked Kelly some questions about her work and studio practice:

Kelly Clare

Kelly Clare

Q: Tell us about your background
Right now I live in Benzie County, the smallest county in Michigan. It has only one full stoplight. Midwinter, there’s a frozen turkey bowling tournament on the ice, right out on the lake. I studied both creative writing and art at Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois, where there is also a lot of ice, but more stoplights, and an incredibly generous group of faculty and students. I spent the last year there as a Post Baccalaureate Fellow managing a letterpress shop.

tork, woodblock, 2 x 3, 2017

tork, woodblock, 2 x 3, 2017

Q: How would you describe your work?
Most of my work pursues a longer predicament. In thinking about language, for example, I often struggle with its collective nature—how can I use “carpet” when senators are suggesting “carpet bombing”; what do I do when the thing I love is used in both impossibly kind and impossibly cruel ways, and what is my responsibility as a participant in this human project.

from RAW DREADFUL CRAZE, 2016, an installation. Each word of a speech given by then potential Republican nominee Ted Cruz was affixed to a pin. Over the course of a few days, participants were asked to reorder words, allowed to reinstall and possibly salvage the language anywhere they’d like.

from RAW DREADFUL CRAZE, 2016, an installation. Each word of a speech given by then potential Republican nominee Ted Cruz was affixed to a pin. Over the course of a few days, participants were asked to reorder words, allowed to reinstall and possibly salvage the language anywhere they’d like.

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At the same time, words have a physical, tangible echo to them when they’re spoken, drawn, molded out of lead, poured out in pancake batter. We absorb their vibrations, eat them as crackers, rearrange them so please gets to be elapse and asleep. There’s something playful there, but also almost holy. A pile of pretzels gets to be wheat and salt—miraculously harvested, ground up, cooked in giant ovens, packaged and shipped worldwide—but at the same time spells out I was and I was / whirling feathers, either bird — / Every hunger / is first century, lines from “Keats is Coughing” by Marianne Boruch. The shape gets to be two things, many things, at once.

Thank you, Grace Paley, installation, 2017

Thank you, Grace Paley, installation, 2017

To my mind, a lot of my work is built on a sort of serious play. Often, even when I’m not thinking about language, about the anagram, I’m invoking that sort of endless possible undo and redo in whatever medium I’m holding onto—printmaking, the essay, installations, sculpture, fibers, drawing, the poem. And I think, as an artist, I’m still getting my legs. I hope to spend most of my life getting my hands dirty like this.

here’s to you, charlotte the sky, 2017

here’s to you, charlotte the sky, 2017

Q: What is your process for creating a work of art?
I don’t know if I have a single, stable process. I show up, I think, mostly, or I try to. Some of my work functions in response to some long, articulable thought, something I can point to and say this anchorable fact is what I’ve been circling around all this time. Some of my work, especially more recent sculptures and drawings, come from impulse. Which isn’t to say they’re not deeply grounded in experience and gathered thought, but they’re much harder to talk about. I can tell you what paint, what sweater, what piece of wood, where the dirt came from, and I could sit with you for a very long time sorting through what the piece is doing successfully or unsuccessfully. I think there is more than one way to cross a river, and sometimes you’re tunneling underneath.

you wouldn't stop glowing, 2017

you wouldn’t stop glowing, 2017

Q: Who are your favorite artists and why?
The list is very long, and includes just as many writers as artists. Mary Ruefle, Eula Biss, and Marilynne Robinson have all been essential in shaping how I think of the world—there’s this thoroughness, integrity, and sometimes delight there in those essays and novels. And I have loved too many poets to name. Ralph Angel, Marianne Boruch, Heather Christle, Carl Phillips. James Tate. C.D. Wright. I feel like I’m writing a thank you note and forgetting everyone. I mean, I wouldn’t be myself without a whole summer of just reading Carole Maso. Or the time I’ve spent listening to Lorrie Moore, Don Delilo, Grace Paley. Not to mention my incredible friends and the faculty I’ve worked with.

straggler, 2016

straggler, 2016

It’s the same with artists. I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about Jen Bervin and Ann Hamilton’s respective bodies of work, their longer thoughts. I love Nina Katchadourian, Sarah Sze, Jessica Stockholder. I love Pedro Reyes piece, Palas por Pistolas, which I think is a brilliant instance of material transformation. The Fluxus movement and Rirkrit Tiravanija’s pad thai. Doris Salcedo, and Cathy Park Hong’s essay responding to her retrospective.

Everyone I gravitate towards thinks along different lines, but throughout there’s a longer, insistent pressure in their work, even when it’s incredibly playful. And I often think of them speaking to each other, across discipline, time, distance, movement. If you asked, I would draw you a little map.

The Work Is / The New York Times, 2015. Print project encompassing the entirety of one copy of the October 11, 2015 edition of the New York Times. After blackout poems were made from the news articles, the newspaper itself was shredded and remade into over 90 small booklets. Each booklet was printed with the blackout poems.

The Work Is / The New York Times, 2015. Print project encompassing the entirety of one copy of the October 11, 2015 edition of the New York Times. After blackout poems were made from the news articles, the newspaper itself was shredded and remade into over 90 small booklets. Each booklet was printed with the blackout poems.

Q: What are your goals for this residency?
I have a few threads I’ve been working on lately, playing with tactility and language, and I hope to stage an installation or two. I would like to continue my reading, drawing, and writing practices, but more than anything else I’m going to try to give myself permission to throw my efforts into serious play, into following the idea, the object, wherever it takes me. To listen in, and hard.

sprint / spring, 2017

sprint / spring, 2017

Q: What’s next for you?
After another summer in Northern Michigan, I hope to settle into an MFA program, fingers crossed.

 Q: Where else can we find you?
kellyclare.weebly.com


Kelly is leading two workshops during her residency at Main Street Arts: paper marbling on Saturday, January 20  and Japanese stab binding on Saturday, February 17. Sign up through the online gallery shop

Meet the Artist in Residence: Nick LaTona

Nick LaTona artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the months of May and June, 2017,  is working on sculptures and artist books  We asked him a few questions about his artwork and studio practice:

Nick LaTona, artist in residence (May/June, 2017)

Nick LaTona, artist in residence (May/June, 2017)

Q: Tell us about yourself A: My name is Nicholas LaTona and I am from Churchville, NY. I currently work at Highland Hospital, Strong Memorial hospital and Entercom Communications. I’ve always been interested in the arts as far back as I can remember. When I was a junior in high school, I started to become invested in the arts and from there I attended college at SUNY Fredonia where I received my BFA. I was always indecisive about concentrating in a specific area but in my junior year is when I began concentrating specifically in sculpture. It took me 5 years to graduate because into the end of my junior year, I decided to have duel major in both sculpture and public relations.

Installation from a residency at The Yards in Rochester

Installation from a residency at The Yards in Rochester

Q: Tell us about your work A: Through the years in college I was exposed to many materials and was specifically drawn to Plaster, Wax, Copper, and Paper. Since graduating my work has drifted more towards using Paper, thread and pigment.

April 19th, artist book

“April 19th”, artist book about a day that changed my life

Q: What inspires you in the studio? A: I draw my inspiration from the medical experiences I’ve been exposed to. I find this helps me process what I’ve seen or have been through personally. This is what I have been concentrating on the past year. I also work on different pieces inspired by everyday experiences and various media I am introduced to.

Inside Nick's studio at Main Street Arts

Inside Nick’s studio at Main Street Arts

Q: What is the most useful tool in your studio? A: The most useful tool(s) in my studio would have to be my cutting board, x-acto knife and ruler. I use those tools the most and they are the most essential tools to have with me. I collect all scrap paper and strands of thread whenever and wherever I can.  I do this so when I make paper I can recycle these bits and pieces and reuse them to make sheets of paper.

Q: Who are some of your favorite artists? A: Felix Gonzalez-Torres and Maggie Taylor. I draw inspiration from many artists, but these two in particular inspired me the moment I discovered their work and they continue to inspire me to this day. Gonzalez-Torres works minimalistic but his works speak powerfully while focusing on activism. Taylor’s work is more focused on surrealism, creating fantasy and dream-like images that are manipulated in Photoshop. I am very inspired by the local artists in Rochester I have had the opportunity to work with or meet. Everyone is exploring great concepts and you learn different ways to see what’s around you and interrupt. This has helped me tremendously through my work by offering positive feedback and motivation.

1992–2016, artist book

“1992–2016″, artist book

Q: Any advice for other artists? A: If I were to give another artist advice, it would be to double the amount of time you think it will take for you to complete work and to allow things to change as you progress through a piece. Everything I have made to this day has changed from my original intent to the finished piece.

Q: Where can we see more of your work? A: You can check out my work on Instagram @Nick_l.art


Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts. Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Housing is available. Submissions are reviewed and residencies awarded quarterly. Upcoming deadline: May 31, 2017 for a residency in July, August, September 2017.

Meet the Artist in Residence: Sam Bogner

Sam Bogner, artist in residence at Main Street Arts during the month of May 2017, is working on celestial sculptures and extra terrestrial relics. We asked her a few questions about her artwork and studio practice.

Sam Bogner, artist in residence

Sam Bogner, artist in residence (May 2017)

Q: Tell us about your background.
A: I am originally from Cleveland but I am currently living in Jersey City, NJ. I earned my BFA in Sculpture and Expanded Media at the Cleveland Institute of Art. This coming fall I’ll begin my graduate work at Rutgers University, where I’ll be studying archives and librarianship.

Q: Tell us about your work.
A: My work is almost always object based, but includes a range in size from miniature sculpture to large scale installation. My material range is also very broad and changes from project to project. I want to tease out sci-fi camp qualities from the material I’m using over any specific medium. My work stems from science fiction’s relationship to science—how as humans we have a cycle of wonder and inspiration, which leads to exploration and discovery. It is so enveloped in pop-culture that we can’t help but confront it. My work embodies the same visual language of classic sci-fi films. Campy effects are used in my installations and objects to create an other worldly experience—one that asks the viewer to suspend belief, to wonder where humanity can go, and what waits to be discovered in the cosmos.

UHO, Destination Moon, detail at dusk  2016 Varying sizes between 18” and 12’  Installation; Mylar, fabric, video, various color-changing lights, resin

UHO, Destination Moon, detail at dusk (2016) Varying sizes between 18” and 12’
Installation; Mylar, fabric, video, various color-changing lights, resin

Q: How would you describe your studio practice?
A: My studio practice is primarily research based. I spend a lot of time making an archive for myself of images, experiences, video, material, pop culture phenomena, etc. I also make a lot of models and plans for work that I don’t have the time or space to make, but maybe someday will realize it. There is something precious about this work for me, I can keep changing it and evolving it over years and when the opportunity strikes, it is ready and waiting. On residency though, I have time to make physical objects based on my research. I rarely have a direct plan, an artwork like this references bits of my archive, but often is directly involved in the experience of the material I’m using.

Sam Bogner, at work in her studio

Sam Bogner, at work in her studio

Q: What is your most useful tool in the studio?
The internet. Its an addiction. When I don’t have the time to re-visit a museum or library, it can fill the void. I don’t keep a traditional sketchbook, rather a large mess of files of interesting things I find. At any given moment I have 20 tabs of things that I want to search into more.

Q: Who are your favorite artists and why?
A: I am always interested in the works of Laurie Anderson, Isa Genzken, Lucio Fontana’s sculptures, Marsha Cottrell, Sarah Sze, Pipilotti Rist, Mike Kelley.

My favorites change a lot, lately I’ve been obsessed with the Instagram feeds of Laura Catherine Soto, Esther Ruiz, Stephanie Sarley. Their range of material, texture, and experience are what keep me coming back to their work.

Giant Sediment from Juni River Delta, Planet Hjl  (2015) 8”–28”  Sculpture; Foam, paint, glitter

Giant Sediment from Juni River Delta, Planet Hjl (2015) 8”–28”, foam, paint, glitter

Q: What do you hope to accomplish during your time here?
A: I am working on a series of space rock formations based on NASA and SETI images. I am also continuing to make a series of extra terrestrial relics.

Q: Where else can we find you?
On instagram @samb0gner and at www.sambognerart.com


Are you an artist looking for new opportunities? Apply for a residency at Main Street Arts. Artists in residence will have 24-hour access to a large studio on our second floor (with great natural light), the option to show work in the gallery, and the opportunity to teach paid workshops. Housing is available. Submissions are reviewed and residencies awarded quarterly. Upcoming deadline: May 31, 2017 for a residency in July, August, September 2017.